Discussion:
Macro from C/C++ to PB
(too old to reply)
Olav
2011-09-04 20:13:05 UTC
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How can C/C++ statements like

#ifndef IDC_STATIC
#define IDC_STATIC (-1)
#ENDIF

#define IDD_DIALOG1 100

be converted PB using a macro?

Thanks in advance!
--
Peter Manders
2011-09-05 22:32:34 UTC
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Post by Olav
How can C/C++ statements like
#ifndef IDC_STATIC
#define IDC_STATIC (-1)
#ENDIF
#define IDD_DIALOG1 100
be converted PB using a macro?
Thanks in advance!
It's explained in the help file under %Def()
--
Peter Manders.

Wise men talk because they have something to say,
fools because they have to say something. (Plato)
Olav
2011-09-06 06:51:38 UTC
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Post by Peter Manders
Post by Olav
How can C/C++ statements like
#ifndef IDC_STATIC
#define IDC_STATIC (-1)
#ENDIF
#define IDD_DIALOG1 100
be converted PB using a macro?
Thanks in advance!
It's explained in the help file under %Def()
Yes, thank you. I know how to rewrite these statements to PB equivalent
statements, but that was not what I was asking for.

I was looking for a solution where these C/C++ directives could be
placed within a PB macro, so that the compiler would be able to cope
with them. If so both the resource compiler and the PB compiler could
use the same header file. Since a macroname can't start with a #, it
looks to me that it isn't possible to do what I had in mind, so I asked
in case there was a solution to it though. And I can't find such a
soulution to it in the help file.

Thanks for your time!
--
Peter Manders
2011-09-06 17:33:29 UTC
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Post by Olav
Post by Peter Manders
Post by Olav
How can C/C++ statements like
#ifndef IDC_STATIC
#define IDC_STATIC (-1)
#ENDIF
#define IDD_DIALOG1 100
be converted PB using a macro?
Thanks in advance!
It's explained in the help file under %Def()
Yes, thank you. I know how to rewrite these statements to PB equivalent
statements, but that was not what I was asking for.
I was looking for a solution where these C/C++ directives could be
placed within a PB macro, so that the compiler would be able to cope
with them. If so both the resource compiler and the PB compiler could
use the same header file. Since a macroname can't start with a #, it
looks to me that it isn't possible to do what I had in mind, so I asked
in case there was a solution to it though. And I can't find such a
soulution to it in the help file.
I can't think of a solution for that either. There would have to be at
least one precompiler directive that both could use.

I don't know your exact objective, but you could use a batch file for
conditional compilation, or to translate the C/C++ file on the fly right
before compilation. I'm guessing you want to make sure that both
compilers use the same include file, or at least the same constants that
are defined in it.
--
Peter Manders.

Wise men talk because they have something to say,
fools because they have to say something. (Plato)
GS
2012-02-14 21:25:55 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Olav
Post by Peter Manders
Post by Olav
How can C/C++ statements like
#ifndef IDC_STATIC
#define IDC_STATIC (-1)
#ENDIF
#define IDD_DIALOG1 100
be converted PB using a macro?
Thanks in advance!
It's explained in the help file under %Def()
Yes, thank you. I know how to rewrite these statements to PB equivalent
statements, but that was not what I was asking for.
I was looking for a solution where these C/C++ directives could be placed
within a PB macro, so that the compiler would be able to cope with them. If
so both the resource compiler and the PB compiler could use the same header
file. Since a macroname can't start with a #, it looks to me that it isn't
possible to do what I had in mind, so I asked in case there was a solution to
it though. And I can't find such a soulution to it in the help file.
Thanks for your time!
Don't know if this would be helpful...

I'm primarily an MS Excel VBA developer who, on occasion, uses VB6 for
some dev work. There are specific differences between Classic VB and
VBA even though they implement the same syntax for coding. That means
that if I want to share code modules (ergo storing only 1 file instead
of 2) between the two I need to write separate lines for each
discipline. Then I can just comment out the inappropriate lines before
compiling. Fortunately, the compiler reminds me if I forget!<g>
--
Garry

Free usenet access at http://www.eternal-september.org
ClassicVB Users Regroup! comp.lang.basic.visual.misc
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